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DOG TREATS: Duck jerky Instructional - how to eat it VIDEO

 

duck jerky dog treatHave you tried your dog in duck before? Probably not as it is moderately exotic and expensive in Australia, well that is until now.

The reason you may like to try it with your dog is that it is a meat that it would not regularly get, which helps expand its body's processing abilities of a new protein.  While in raw form it is high in saturated fat, this is not an issue for dried duck such as in these treats.

Also you should note that saturated fats are an issue for humans, not dogs, who use proteins and fats as their main source of energy and do not suffer cholesterol problems like their owners.


Duck jerky is also good in that along with some fish products, beef jerky, chicken breast flilet, and roo jerky, it is 100% meat. You will rarely find 20% meat in most dog foods or super market treats (unless it is pork or a bone type treat) let alone 100% meat.

Also one pound (287 g) of duck presents 66% percent of a humans daily requirements, so it is likely to also present a large part of your dogs protein needs too.

I would have thought that my dog (a spoodle/ cockapoo) may not have liked the taste of duck, as his poodle side tends to be a little bit choosy. However just like fresh cooked chicken he seems to love the duck jerky just as much, see video below for proof.

Specifics of duck jerky treats

As you will see in this video the duck jerky treats tend to come in fillets a little smaller than the chicken breast fillets. They also tend to be a little more pliable (as long as you reseal the packets).

An interesting point about duck is that it does have that more 'gamey' taste that some people either love or hate. I have found that my dog is more partial to chicken leg than chicken breast, perhaps because the meat is often more brown and gamey in taste. Perhaps this is why he is so partial to duck jerky?

The table below may not represent exactly the breed of duck used for dog treats, however as a quick grab off the net, it gives you a good indication that duck indeed is a very complete source of nutrition for dogs - particularly when used in conjunction with other meats for their main meal, offal and bones.

Nutrient content of 100 gram (3.53 oz.) edible portions of various parts of cooked Pekin duck (not the exact duck used in these treats)

http://www.duckhealth.com/foodvalu.html

Nutrient

Unit

Lean meat only

Whole

Breast

Leg

Food energy

kcal

201

140

178

Fat

g

11

3

6

Protein

g

24

28

29

Calcium

mg

12

9

10

Iron

mg

2.7

4.5

2.3

Magnesium

mg

20

ND

ND

Phosphorus

mg

203

ND

ND

Potassium

mg

252

ND

ND

Sodium

mg

65

105

108

Zinc

mg

2.6

ND

ND

Copper

mg

0.23

ND

ND

Manganese

mg

0.02

ND

ND

Selenium

mcg

22

29

22

Thiamine

mg

0.26

ND

ND

Riboflavin

mg

0.47

ND

ND

Niacin

mg

5.1

10.4

5.3

Pantothenic acid

mg

1.5

ND

ND

Vitamin B6

mg

0.25

ND

ND

Folic acid

mcg

10

ND

ND

Vitamin B12

mcg

0.4

ND

ND

Vitamin A

IU

77

ND

ND

Vitamin E

mg

0.7

ND

ND

Vitamin C

mg

ND

3.2

2.3

Linoleic acid

g

1.3

0.3

0.8

Satu. fatty acids

g

4.2

0.6

1.3

Mono-unsat. fatty a.

g

3.7

0.9

2.6

Poly-unsat. fatty a.

g

1.4

0.4

0.9

Cholesterol

mg

89

143

105

Duck nutrition summary: "Duck is an excellent source of high quality protein containing a well-balanced array of amino acids. Duck also contains generous amounts of iron, phosphorus, zinc, copper, selenium, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid, Vitamin B6, Vitamin B12, and lesser amounts of Potassium, Magnesium, Vitamin E, Vitamin A, Vitamin C and folic acid."

Article by Bruce Dwyer. If you wish to use any of this information please refer to the article as a reference and provide a link to http://www.healthydogtreats.com.au

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