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Dog Treats and how we buy them online throughout the week in Australia

dog treat australia search trends 2017Do you know how people buy dog treats online throughout the week in Australia, let alone the reason they buy them at a given hour? Google might have some of the answers.

The attached graph is from Google trends data Australia. It is for the week 16-22 Dec 2017 because they give hourly data only for the most recent week. You will see that there is a big variance between days for a given hour (x axis) which means standard deviation information is of little use.

And the data is so cluttered that picking a trend between the days is of little use too. But that is what happens when you take any one week in isolation and look at its average search values.

Dog Treats online sales hourly trend Australia

While there is little point comparing days with each other, the thick black line (average of the week) shows the weekly trend which does have some value to it. We then averaged the working week hours (monday to Friday) to see if the weekend search habits changed the data much (thick RED line)

 

Before analysis, we realise that Perth is 3 hours different to The eastern states at this time of year, however population wise, that should only have a small tempering affect on the total data.

Dog treat searches The early hours 1- 7 am

As expected little searching or buying occurs during these hours.  The lowest hour is 3 am on average. From 3 am to 7 am there is a steady rise in searches for dog treats.  While there has been  a big rise in mobile searching (phones and tablets) the dip at 8 am is likely to be during the commuting time.

Dog treat searches 9 am to noon

By 9 am people are most likely starting to do the 'hard yards' at whatever work they are doing. But there is an increase in searching by Ten am, eleven and noon as the average searches for the week are all approximately the same relatively high amount.

A slight drop in searching for Dog Treats on Google is experienced around 1 pm - perhaps this is a lunch break where food takes a priority.

Then between 2 to 4 pm there is a simialar high search pattern as for the 9 am to noon rate. Makes you wonder if everyone is searching during office hours or on the job site? Why not after work?

5pm to 6 pm  we see a drop down from the previous three hours rates.  One might speculate that this is the great Australian commute back to home.

7 pm on average is the equal greatest search hour for dog treats in Australia along with 10 am. Looks like people have just gotten home, or have they finished dinner and are back on their electronic devices?

8 pm sees a dramatic drop in dog treat searches. While not everyone has kids this could either be childrens bed time hour (story-telling time), or perhaps when people unwind and do other things besides get online?

Then there is a small surge for searching at between 9 and 11 pm (but not at the levels see during the day working hours (10- 12 noon and 2-4 pm).

NOTE the black like is for 7 days data, while the RED thick line is for just Monday to Friday.  As the trends are VERY similar it appears that our habits on each seven days of the week are very similar for searching.

CONCULSION

online acitivyt6 (searching for "dog treats") inj Australia was relatively low between 2 am and 4 am with the lowest search time at 3 am.

Commuting hours of 8 am and 5 pm tend on average to be the lowest search  hours throughout the major waking part of the day. This was even true for the full week average, so it appears that people are not searching while commuting even if that involves having the opportunity to do so using such services as public transport.

8 pm (full week and working week) was still a dip in searching habits, perhaps for dinner or putting kids to bed.

Of course this is all speculation and none of it might be true, however it is always interesting to see some predictability in search habits, even if this judgement was taken for one week of data and there were big variances in days.

Google+